Eye Health / Blindness News From Medical News Today

Eye health is a broad subject that includes conditions such as blindness, allergies, color blindness, sties, eye diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration (AMD), surgical procedures such as cataract surgery, cornea transplant, and vision problems including astigmatism, blurry vision, hyperopia (farsightedness) and myopia (nearsightedness).
  1. Why is my eyelash growing in the wrong direction?
    Instead of becoming trapped under the skin, an ingrown eyelash may grow in the wrong direction, toward the eye. This is called trichiasis, and it can cause irritation, pain, and damage to the cornea. Injury, inflammation, or certain conditions may be responsible. Medical treatment is often necessary. Learn more here.
  2. How long are you contagious with pink eye?
    Pink eye is a relatively common eye condition. There are many potential causes, but one of the most significant problems is how not to spread the condition to others. There are different types of pink eye, which can change the length of contagiousness. Knowing the signs can help a person avoid infecting anybody else.
  3. Does the 20-20-20 rule prevent eye strain?
    The 20-20-20 rule says that after spending 20 minutes on the computer, a person should spend 20 seconds looking at an object 20 feet away. This may help to prevent eyes from becoming dry or watery. Here, learn why the 20-20-20 rule is effective. We also describe other ways to protect the eyes from digital strain.
  4. What happens if you sleep with your eyes open?
    People sometimes sleep with their eyes open, which is known medically as nocturnal lagophthalmos. Symptoms caused by this condition include redness and blurry vision. Treatment options include eye drops, moisture goggles, or even surgery. It does not usually have serious complications. Learn more about it here.
  5. What to know about sulfa allergies
    A sulfa allergy is when the immune system reacts to substances containing sulfa, such as some antibiotics and medications. A person with a sulfa allergy should avoid certain medications but does not need to avoid any specific foods. Learn how sulfa and sulfite allergies differ, and about symptoms and treatment.